A “new town” for Dunsfold? Council meets to consider Local Plan


A “new town” of 2,600 houses at Dunsfold Aerodrome is among proposals in the new draft Local Plan to be considered by Waverley Borough Council tonight (Tuesday July 19).

The airfield site is already subject to a planning application for 1,800 homes and this total will inevitably rise if the new Local Plan is adopted. Dunsfold Park, owners of the site, has suggested that eventually up to 3,400 houses could be built.

Hambledon Parish Council has objected to the application and has joined with other parishes in the area in arguing that narrow country lanes will not be able to cope with the additional traffic.  The only major road near the site, the A281, is already at a standstill at peak times. To avoid this new home owners will be forced to “rat-run” by using single-track rural roads such as Markwick Lane, Salt Lane and Vann Lane to reach Milford and Witley stations, schools, shops and places of work.

POW protest

If Waverley adopts the new Local Plan, efforts to fight the Dunsfold Park proposals will be seriously undermined. In 2009 Waverley refused a similar housing application for the site, upheld by a Government inspector on appeal. Today, although reasons for objecting remain the same, Waverley is under central Government pressure to build more than 500 new homes across the borough every year to 2032.

Waverley’s executive has already recommended the new Local Plan be formally published and the full council meets tonight at 7pm to consider endorsing this recommendation. If this happens there will be a minimum six-week for representations before the plan is submitted for examination by a Government Planning Inspector.

Protect Our Waverley, a campaign group set up to fight the proposals, will be staging a demonstration outside Waverley offices before tonight’s meeting.



2 thoughts on “A “new town” for Dunsfold? Council meets to consider Local Plan

  1. Out of school holidays, Witley station car park is usually full by 8am with commuters having to park in disabled bays or anywhere else they can squeeze into.

    The local schools are also full to capacity as are the waiting lists for the local doctors’ surgeries.

    How on earth is the infrastructure supposed to cope with 2,000 new homes? It’s simply not feasible without dramatically eroding the lives of those already living here.

  2. So if this development does not go ahead where else are homes going to be built to satisfy demand for local hoising? I accept the arguments about lack of infrastructure but to simply oppose all new developments is not a realistic or desirable position to take on such a important issue.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *